2012 Program Archive

January 3 - "Incredibly Expensive and Disturbingly Lazy"; Young Iowans For Ron Paul; The Author of "Why Iowa?"

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We begin with David Sirota, a nationally-syndicated weekly newspaper columnist, award-winning radio host and best-selling author. He has an article at Salon that argues the intense media coverage of the Iowa caucuses has been incredibly expensive and disturbingly lazy. david sirota

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Then we speak with a reporter on the ground in Iowa who has been covering the candidates and has spoken with prospective voters. Elise Foley, a reporter with the Huffington Post based in Washington DC, joins us. We  discuss how young voters are reacting to candidates trying to appeal to the youth vote and how Iowans who have been bombarded with negative TV ads, are reacting to last-minute pitches by candidates who at the end of the day will be spending up to 250 dollars per vote. elise foley

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Part 3

Then finally, we look into the significance of this relatively recent electoral phenomenon that is breaking campaign spending records and attracting unprecedented media coverage, yet has a mixed record in picking presidential winners. David Redlawsk, a polling expert and professor of political science at Rutgers University joins us. He is the author of “Why Iowa?: How Caucuses and Sequential Elections Improve the Presidential Nominating Process”. david redlawsk
  MUSIC: Built to Spill - Center of the Universe; Arcade Fire - City With No Children; Wilco - Side With The Seeds; Radiohead - Electioneering  

 

January 2 - The Media Bombardment of Iowans; Iranian War Games; "Biden Gets China"

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We begin with the last day of campaigning before Tuesday’s Iowa caucuses and speak with Mack Shelley, a professor of Political Science and Statistics at Iowa State University. We discuss the apparent tie between front-runners Ron Paul, Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney and get a local perspective on the media bombardment of Iowans and a broader national perspective on a growing sense of alienation and disgust with our broken democracy at the same time that unprecedented media attention is focused on the ritual of our democratic electoral process.

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Then, with President Obama’s recent signing of a controversial bill imposing sanctions against Iran’s Central Bank, and Iran’s retaliation with missile tests and naval exercises in the Gulf, along with a recent threat by Iran’s Vice-President to shut the Straits of Hormuz, we look into whether the U.S. and Iran are on a collision course. A specialist on Iran, Maziar Behrooz, joins us to assess how much both sides are on a trajectory towards war, having trapped themselves into an escalation of rhetoric and actions where any spark could set off a conflagration in a volatile region that supplies 20% of the world’s oil. maziar behrooz

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Then finally the Washington Editor-at-large for the Atlantic and editor-in-chief of Atlantic LIVE, Steve Clemons joins us to discuss the growing importance of the Vice President’s role in foreign affairs with Joe Biden about to take charge of U.S./China relations that the White House recently announced as its new priority in the coming years. We discuss how someone who has been gaining more power and influence quietly working behind the scenes in a number of critical foreign policy areas, could be the subject of rumors that suggest he will be jettisoned from the 2012 ticket for Hillary Clinton to run as vice-president steve clemons
  MUSIC: The Strokes - You Talk Way Too Much; Buffalo Springfield - For What It's Worth; Arcade Fire - Intervention; Bonobo - Kiara  

 

January 1 - A Year-End Review and a Preview of Our Foreign Policy; The Domestic Political Landscape Ahead After a Year of Gridlock, Extortion and Dysfunction

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On this New Year’s Day we examine both our foreign policy, looking back to 2013 and ahead to 2014, and our domestic policy over the past turbulent year and into this election year of 2014 just beginning. The author of a new book on the history of U.S.- Afghan relations and a comparative history of the inner politics of the U.S. and Soviet Russia,  Roger Morris, who served in the United States Foreign Service and on the Senior Staff of the National Security Council under both Presidents Johnson and Nixon, joins us to analyze the events of last year and the global landscape ahead, from Russian to China, the Middle East to Europe and Brazil to Africa. We assess our foreign policy, past and future, in a world of rising and falling powers, with much of the first world moving from democracy to oligarchy and the second and third world beset by criminal leadership, as global inequality increases and ecological plunder continues.

roger morris

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Then we look at the domestic political arena with Robert Jensen, a professor in the School of Journalism at the University of Texas and the author of “Arguing for Our Lives: A User’s Guide to Constructive Dialogue”. We discuss divisions within the Republican Party with the influence of the Tea Party receding as the GOP enters an election carrying the baggage from the destructive antics of the far right in 2013. And we also explore emerging divisions in the Democratic Party between the corporate wing and the economic populists who want to campaign against the nation’s growing income inequality, while the more business-friendly centrists are concerned about a repeat of the McGovern, Mondale, Dukakis and Kerry disasters that caution them to want to be more like the Republicans.

robert jenson